Where current of statement is not updating correct row oracle england english dating

11-Jan-2017 21:24

In this article I’ll give an overview of each feature, help you understand how to choose among them, and point out some things to watch out for. I assume My ISAM tables without support for transactions, with the following sample data: create table t1 ( a int not null primary key, b int not null, c int not null ) type=My ISAM; create table t2 ( d int not null primary key, e int not null, f int not null ) type=My ISAM; insert into t1 (a, b, c) values (1, 2, 3), (2, 4, 6), (3, 6, 9); insert into t2 (d, e, f) values (1, 1, 1), (4, 4, 4), (5, 5, 5);.

Recall that in My SQL, a primary key is simply a unique index named PRIMARY.

Even though the cursor stores multiple records, only one record can be processed at a time, which is called as current row.

When you fetch a row the current row position moves to next row.

A trigger may be specified to fire whenever a DELETE, INSERT, or UPDATE of a particular database table occurs, or whenever an UPDATE occurs on on one or more specified columns of a table.

At this time SQLite supports only FOR EACH ROW triggers, not FOR EACH STATEMENT triggers.

A cursor can hold more than one row, but can process only one row at a time.

They are also created when a SELECT statement that returns just one row is executed.

They must be created when you are executing a SELECT statement that returns more than one row.

What I want to do is either insert only the new rows, or insert the new rows and update the changed rows (depending on the scenario). If I want to insert only the rows that will not violate the unique index, I can: Which method to use largely depends on requirements.

If the software must support multiple database backends or versions, perhaps the generic, standard queries are the best bet.

A cursor can hold more than one row, but can process only one row at a time.

They are also created when a SELECT statement that returns just one row is executed.

They must be created when you are executing a SELECT statement that returns more than one row.

What I want to do is either insert only the new rows, or insert the new rows and update the changed rows (depending on the scenario). If I want to insert only the rows that will not violate the unique index, I can: Which method to use largely depends on requirements.

If the software must support multiple database backends or versions, perhaps the generic, standard queries are the best bet.

If no WHEN clause is supplied, the SQL statements are executed every time the trigger fires.