Liuzza dating beowulf

31-Dec-2016 21:54

Roy Liuzza is an American scholar of Old English literature.

A professor at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, Liuzza is the former editor of the Old English Newsletter.

Damico illustrates the poet’s use of the tools of his trade—compression, substitution, skillful encoding of character—to reinterpret and transform grave sociopolitical “facts” of history, to produce what may be characterized as a type of historical allegory, whereby two parallel narratives, one literal and another veiled are simultaneously operative.

, not as a monster narrative nor a folklorish nor solely a legendary tale, but rather as a poem of its time, a historical allegory coping with and reconfiguring sociopolitical events of the first half of eleventh-century Anglo-Saxon England.

Helen Damico presents the first concentrated discussion of the initiatory two-thirds of Beowulf’s 3,182 lines in the context of the sociopolitically turbulent years that composed the first half of the eleventh century in Anglo-Danish England.

That is, assessment of: the dating of the poem and its implications for literary interpretation; genre (heroic, epic, or encyclopaedic), style and metre, structure, themes (heroism, kingship, feud, monstrosity, beliefs); major critical interpretations of the poem (Christian and/or pagan, consolation and celebration, implications of the poem for the study of gender in the early medieval world); and, finally, the cultural world of the Migration Age as represented in the poem.

Credit value: 15Module convenor: Carl Kears Assessment: 1 x translation exercise (25%); 1 x 2500 word essay (75%)Teaching pattern: 1 x 2 hour seminar per week Pre-requisites: 5AAEB005 Cultural Encounters Module description: This module offers an opportunity to study in detail the best-known long poem of the Anglo-Saxon period, , from the perspective of its manuscript, editions, translations, language and poetry.

Using the title of 'heroes and other monsters' as a rough guide, we will examine the ways in which the poem anticipates and manipulates key critical concepts such as place, time, gender, violence and memory.

Given the poet’s compositional skill—widely relational and eclectic at its core—and his affinity with the practicing skalds, these strings of parallelisms could scarcely have been coincidental.

Rather, Damico argues that examined within the context of other eleventh-century texts that either bemoaned or darkly satirized or obversely celebrated the rise of the Anglo-Danish realm, the Beowulfian units may bring forth a deeper understanding of the complexity of the poet’s compositional process.

That is, assessment of: the dating of the poem and its implications for literary interpretation; genre (heroic, epic, or encyclopaedic), style and metre, structure, themes (heroism, kingship, feud, monstrosity, beliefs); major critical interpretations of the poem (Christian and/or pagan, consolation and celebration, implications of the poem for the study of gender in the early medieval world); and, finally, the cultural world of the Migration Age as represented in the poem.

Credit value: 15Module convenor: Carl Kears Assessment: 1 x translation exercise (25%); 1 x 2500 word essay (75%)Teaching pattern: 1 x 2 hour seminar per week Pre-requisites: 5AAEB005 Cultural Encounters Module description: This module offers an opportunity to study in detail the best-known long poem of the Anglo-Saxon period, , from the perspective of its manuscript, editions, translations, language and poetry.

Using the title of 'heroes and other monsters' as a rough guide, we will examine the ways in which the poem anticipates and manipulates key critical concepts such as place, time, gender, violence and memory.

Given the poet’s compositional skill—widely relational and eclectic at its core—and his affinity with the practicing skalds, these strings of parallelisms could scarcely have been coincidental.

Rather, Damico argues that examined within the context of other eleventh-century texts that either bemoaned or darkly satirized or obversely celebrated the rise of the Anglo-Danish realm, the Beowulfian units may bring forth a deeper understanding of the complexity of the poet’s compositional process.

The strong are, as a matter of fact, never absolutely strong, nor are the weak absolutely weak, but neither is aware of this. Where there is no room for reflection, there is none either for justice or prudence."--Simone Weil (from "The Iliad, or The Poem of Force")In this course, we are going to focus primarily on the Old English epic poem Beowulf, and on the subject of ancient and modern warfare.