Manager intimidating employees

05-Jan-2017 18:12

"Your goal as a manager is not to be liked by need a strong team and following to thrive in your career." To avoid having to deal with those consequences, among many others, you'll need to recognize the signs and make changes to your behavior, attitude, and approach to leading.

Here are 16 subtle signs your employees may secretly hate you: "The very first sign that things are going awry in your relationships with employees is a general gnawing feeling that you can't put your finger on," Taylor says.

The key is that the actions or comments are viewed as demeaning and unacceptable to the recipient.

Bullying may be characterised as offensive, intimidating, malicious or insulting behaviour, an abuse or misuse of power through means intended to undermine, humiliate, denigrate or injure the recipient.

The purpose of this intimidation is to force someone to do something.

"Your staff will be very adept at making it a well-kept secret because they will do everything to keep their job security intact," says Lynn Taylor, a national workplace expert and the author of "Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant: How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job." She continues: "But if you decide to boost your emotional-intelligence radar and look for subtle signs that your team may be unhappy, you'll uncover a wealth of actionable feedback." Michael Kerr, an international business speaker and author of "The Humor Advantage," agrees that it's important to know how your employees feel about you.This clarity, however, isn’t necessarily objective. Personal circumstances and opinions often dictate what people believe.An objective definition of bullying is as follows: it is the use of superior influence or strength to intimidate. Or he caves immediately under pressure and fails to support you in accomplishing your job. He takes credit for your work, never provides positive feedback and misses each meeting he schedules with you.

"Your staff will be very adept at making it a well-kept secret because they will do everything to keep their job security intact," says Lynn Taylor, a national workplace expert and the author of "Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant: How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job." She continues: "But if you decide to boost your emotional-intelligence radar and look for subtle signs that your team may be unhappy, you'll uncover a wealth of actionable feedback." Michael Kerr, an international business speaker and author of "The Humor Advantage," agrees that it's important to know how your employees feel about you.This clarity, however, isn’t necessarily objective. Personal circumstances and opinions often dictate what people believe.An objective definition of bullying is as follows: it is the use of superior influence or strength to intimidate. Or he caves immediately under pressure and fails to support you in accomplishing your job. He takes credit for your work, never provides positive feedback and misses each meeting he schedules with you. He's a bully, intrusive, controlling, picky or petty.