Non sedating antihistamine

02-Feb-2017 13:06

Antihistamines are classified into two groups – the first-generation (“sedating”) and second-generation (“non-sedating”).

Sedating antihistamines cause sedation as they are highly lipid soluble and readily cross the blood brain barrier.

This sedating activity is sometimes used in managing conditions such as eczema where sleep maybe disturbed due to pruritus.

Sedating antihistamines also have significant antimuscarinic activity and should be used with caution in patients with prostatic hypertrophy, urinary retention and angle-closure glaucoma.

Receptor binding data indicate that at a concentration of 2–3 ng/m L (7 nanomolar), desloratadine shows significant interaction with the human histamine H1-receptor.

Bender, Ph D, of National Jewish Medical and Research Center in Denver.So concludes a new study published in the current issue of Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology in which researchers compared 18 previous trials investigating antihistamine-caused sedation levels in 1,500 people between ages 8 and 81.Most of the studies reviewed used doses that were twice the recommended amount -- 50 milligrams -- of diphenhydramine, the active ingredient in Benadryl and other first-generation "sedating" allergy medications.Antihistamines are a class of agents that block histamine release from histamine-1 receptors and are used to treat the symptoms of an allergic reaction, such as edema (swelling), itch, inflammation (redness), sneezing, or a runny nose or watery eyes.Antihistamines can be further divided into those unlikely to cause drowsiness (non-sedating antihistamines) or those likely to cause drowsiness (sedating antihistamines).

Bender, Ph D, of National Jewish Medical and Research Center in Denver.

So concludes a new study published in the current issue of Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology in which researchers compared 18 previous trials investigating antihistamine-caused sedation levels in 1,500 people between ages 8 and 81.

Most of the studies reviewed used doses that were twice the recommended amount -- 50 milligrams -- of diphenhydramine, the active ingredient in Benadryl and other first-generation "sedating" allergy medications.

Antihistamines are a class of agents that block histamine release from histamine-1 receptors and are used to treat the symptoms of an allergic reaction, such as edema (swelling), itch, inflammation (redness), sneezing, or a runny nose or watery eyes.

Antihistamines can be further divided into those unlikely to cause drowsiness (non-sedating antihistamines) or those likely to cause drowsiness (sedating antihistamines).

Antihistamines like Zyrtec and Claritin are designed to calm the histamine reaction your body has when it’s exposed to an allergen.