Dating sites for scientists

27-Aug-2016 22:32

In dating sites, science-based online dating sites are those pair-matching websites that claim to use “science”, such as chemistry, genetics, psychology, or the scientific method, etc., to match up potential couples.[1] , motto: “lets people experience real chemistry”, a subsidiary of (Alexa-rank: 310), launched in 2006 and developed, in large part, on the theories of American anthropologist Helen Fisher, which claims to match people according to compatibility and chemistry.By having singles send in saliva samples, the site facilitates a laboratory analysis of each person's immune system type and, using this data, claims to create optimized “physical chemistry” or "sexual chemistry" between people based on the sweaty T-shirt study, a pattern, discovered in 1995, which finds that people are most attracted to the smell of people who have the most-dissimilar immune system.[4] The site was conceived by Holzle, a long-time internet site dater, after watching a TV discussion on the findings of the sweaty T-shirt study.Are you carefully weighing every factor that makes someone a good romantic match?Not according to a study of more than 1 million interactions on a dating website published this week in the .Instead, the results indicate that you are probably looking for "deal breakers," harshly eliminating those who do not live up to your standards. People met their romantic partners through the recommendations of friends, family, or even at real-world locations known as "bars." Whatever signals and decisions led people to couple up were lost to science. According to the Pew Research Center, 5% of Americans in a committed romantic relationship say they met their partner through an online dating site.

Beyond Match.com, OKCupid, e Harmony and the like, there are hundreds if not thousands of somewhat bizarre websites for niche audiences.[2] In 2008, was the fourth largest online dating site, based on number of singles available; largely due to a successful ad campaign targeting e Harmony (#5 largest dating site) and their anti-gay Christian-only, who regect people who aren't happy all the time (adjacent video).[3] uses information such as middle-finger-to-ring-finger length ratios (digit ratio), an indication of testosterone levels, and personality type matching assessments, such as by asking people "do you like to count things"; counters have high dopamine levels and tend to be the "explorer type".Because of a nondisclosure agreement, the researchers can't reveal the exact source of their subjects, describing it only as an "established, marriage-oriented, subscription-based dating site" from which they randomly selected 1855 people, all based in New York City.Besides photographs, each user's profile could include any number of personal details including age, height, weight, education, marital status, number of children, and smoking and drinking habits.

Beyond Match.com, OKCupid, e Harmony and the like, there are hundreds if not thousands of somewhat bizarre websites for niche audiences.

[2] In 2008, was the fourth largest online dating site, based on number of singles available; largely due to a successful ad campaign targeting e Harmony (#5 largest dating site) and their anti-gay Christian-only, who regect people who aren't happy all the time (adjacent video).

[3] uses information such as middle-finger-to-ring-finger length ratios (digit ratio), an indication of testosterone levels, and personality type matching assessments, such as by asking people "do you like to count things"; counters have high dopamine levels and tend to be the "explorer type".

Because of a nondisclosure agreement, the researchers can't reveal the exact source of their subjects, describing it only as an "established, marriage-oriented, subscription-based dating site" from which they randomly selected 1855 people, all based in New York City.

Besides photographs, each user's profile could include any number of personal details including age, height, weight, education, marital status, number of children, and smoking and drinking habits.

The data set includes some 1.1 million interactions between users.