Thermoluminescence dating of a deep sea sediment core dating screennames

26-Aug-2016 19:43

Post IR quartz-based optical dating was previously proved to be consistent with AMS radiocarbon ages, obtained from planktonic foraminifera from the same core.

IRSL De values are, with one exception, always much greater than the corresponding (post-IR) OSL results.

Mean bankfull discharges on Cooper Creek upstream of the Innamincka Dome at 250–230 ka or oxygen isotope stages (OIS) 7–6 are estimated to have been 5 to 7 times larger than those of today, however, substantially less reworking has occurred during and after OIS 5 than before.Lower Cooper Creek appears to have similarly declined.In the Tirari Desert adjacent to Lake Eyre there is evidence of widespread alluvial activity, perhaps during but certainly before the Middle Pleistocene, yet the river became laterally restricted in OIS 7 to 5.Relative-dating techniques are nearly always applicable but are not precise and require calibration.Correlation techniques are locally useful and depend on recognition of an event whose age is known, such as a volcanic eruption or a paleomagnetic reversal.

Mean bankfull discharges on Cooper Creek upstream of the Innamincka Dome at 250–230 ka or oxygen isotope stages (OIS) 7–6 are estimated to have been 5 to 7 times larger than those of today, however, substantially less reworking has occurred during and after OIS 5 than before.

Lower Cooper Creek appears to have similarly declined.

In the Tirari Desert adjacent to Lake Eyre there is evidence of widespread alluvial activity, perhaps during but certainly before the Middle Pleistocene, yet the river became laterally restricted in OIS 7 to 5.

Relative-dating techniques are nearly always applicable but are not precise and require calibration.

Correlation techniques are locally useful and depend on recognition of an event whose age is known, such as a volcanic eruption or a paleomagnetic reversal.

Geologic assessment of active tectonism depends on two key measures: the age and the amount of deformation of a given stratigraphic unit.